Daigger Group People

Dr. Glen T. Daigger

Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Michigan

Ph.D., P.E., BCEE, NAE,
IWA Distinguished Fellow, WEF Fellow
ASCE Distinguished Member
Professor of Engineering Practice

Ph.D. Students

Avery Carlson

Environmental Engineering

Research Project: Avery’s work revolves around identifying underlying factors causing dispersed bacterial growth and membrane fouling at a regional wastewater plant, and establishing a framework for finding a long-term solution.

Brett Wagner

Environmental Engineering

Research Project: Brett is in the startup phase for a lab-scale membrane aerated biofilm reactor that utilizes a partial nitritation/anammox biofilm.

Cheng Yang

Environmental Engineering

Research Project: Cheng’s research focuses on statistical analysis, data mining and modeling over wastewater treatment process units. Projects include biological and chemical phosphorous removal evaluation in the Detroit Wastewater Resource Recovery Facility, achieved by wastewater characterization, historical data regression, and model simulation with SUMO.

Master’s Students

Ross Vander Meulen

Environmental Engineering

Research Project: Ross is focusing on the biological and chemical phosphorus removal in the Great Lakes Water Authority Wastewater Resource Recovery Facility. This research is currently being achieved through further wastewater characterization, data analysis and regression, and model simulation with SUMO.

Tong Yu (Yet Yu)

Environmental Engineering

Research Project: Yet is focusing on the wastewater primary treatment, including Phosphorous, BOD and COD removal by applying Ferric Chloride and polymers, in the Great Lakes Water Authority Detroit Wastewater Resource Recovery Facility. This research is currently being achieved through jar test, further wastewater characterization, and data analysis.

Yuewei Liu

Environmental Engineering

Research Project: Yuewei focuses on the biological phosphorus removal during wastewater process in Wastewater Resource Recovery Facility at Detroit. By comparing the data collected from the aeration tank and the data obtained from the simulation of the wastewater treatment process, improvements are able to be made to achieve a better phosphorus removal performance.

Former Members